Amelia

There’s a lot you can do with a name like Amelia. You can play with it, sure, is what you think I’m going to say. Make it cute (Amy), or cuter (Millie), complaining (Meelie), or French, I guess, like the movie (Amelie). You can step right into that name, is what I mean, and walk around. Swim with it or spill it on your shirt. Whisper it over like a sad, soft ache, or bark it out aloud like a mad, manic message: camellia, come heee-re, a-million, ah murder you, ye-ah.

(Jaclyn Moriarty, Dreaming of Amelia, Macmillan, 2010)

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Alicia

If you say “Alicia” quickly it sounds just like a well-behaved sneeze.

(Diana Wynne Jones, The Merlin conspiracy, Collins, 2003)

Agatha

Agatha Mary Clarissa was named after her mother and grandmother, the name of Agatha, she believed, being added by Clara … as a result of a suggestion made on the way to the christening. (One of Clara’s favourite novels was, moreover, Miss Mulock’s Agatha’s Husband.)

…. As her publisher told her in 1920, it was an unusual and therefore memorable name.

(Janet Morgan, Agatha Christie, 1985)

Abdullah

Abdullah
“What a fine name the hero of that story had,” she said aloud. “If I were a man I would wish my parents had called me that.”

(1001 Arabian Nights adapted by Geraldine McCaughrean.)

On Naming

Pa drove happily… thinking of his six children and the splendid, handsome names he and Ma had given them. Jolly good names, perfick, every one of them, he thought. There was a reason for them all. Montgomery, the only boy, had been named after the general. Primrose had come in the Spring. Zinnia and Petunia were twins and they were the flowers Ma liked most. Victoria, the youngest girl, had been born in plum-time.

(H.E. Bates, The Darling Buds of May, 1958)